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14 Career Options For People With ADHD

From unique paths to success to embracing their differences, these professionals with ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) are breaking stereotypes and excelling in their fields. 

A user asked the forum, “What Careers do people have here?”

The original poster added, “Currently finishing my last year studying film at university, have immensely enjoyed the creative aspect of my work, but when it comes to technical details like color grading in editing, sound levels, and selecting camera options, it makes me feel immediately deflated.

I was just wondering what jobs people have, whether they hate or love their jobs, and what might be good for people with ADHD.

Here are the top responses.

CARPENTER

carpet install repair

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Carpentry involves a diverse range of tasks, from planning and designing projects to selecting materials, using tools, and overcoming construction challenges. This variety prevents boredom and allows individuals with ADHD to focus on areas that align with their interests and skills.

A user suggests taking up carpentry. He says, “I’m a self-employed carpenter; I get to let loose my perfectionist tendencies and hyperfocus since I also work solo. I get to make good money and be creative, clients get fantastic products, and I wouldn’t trade it for anything. 

I will never hire anyone, either. It is almost like therapy for me. Even the paperwork. I get to experiment with every part of my company as much as I want.”

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATION CENTER 

sales, call, woman

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Another suggested working at a communication center. 

“I run a 9-1-1 emergency communications center. I’ve made a successful career through my ability to function in chaotic situations with ever-changing priorities. I tell everyone that I do my best work in a panic.” shared one.

PROFESSOR 

professor

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Individuals with ADHD often experience hyperfocus, a state of intense concentration on a specific activity. This can be advantageous for professors who need to focus on research, writing, or preparing lectures.

“Professor. I get to do the thing I hyper-focus on, so it’s a pretty good fit, especially since I don’t think I could do anything else.” said one.

NURSE

nurse

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Hospitals are dynamic and fast-paced, providing constant stimulation and requiring quick thinking and adaptability, which can be engaging for individuals with ADHD.

“I’m a NICU (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit) nurse and mostly work with critically ill premature infants. Somewhere, I read that ADHD can thrive in ICU (Intensive Care Unit)- or emergency room-type healthcare jobs because of adrenaline.

Time management is hard at first, but after doing it long enough, it becomes like autopilot. Also, every day is slightly different, so I don’t get bored. Also, the babies are super cute, so that’s a bonus.” said one.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 

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IT professionals must often wear many hats, tackling diverse tasks like problem-solving, coding, system administration, and user support. This variety can prevent boredom and allow for creativity and innovation.

“Information Technology (IT). More specifically, a Systems Administrator. It lets me try new and interesting technologies, as well as the thrill of troubleshooting complex issues. Even better when it’s critical and everyone is freaking out. I will do my best work so I can remain calm.” said one.

SOFTWARE DEVELOPER 

software development

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Developers spend a lot of time solving complex problems and breaking them down into smaller, manageable pieces. This intellectually stimulating process can be rewarding for individuals with ADHD who enjoy using logic and analytical thinking.

A user said, “Software developer. I am somewhat of a bug squisher, so pretty often, I get a task to delve deep into some old piece and make it work again. I can have as much ADHD as I like as long as I keep fixing those things.”

HOME INSPECTOR

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“Home Inspector. You’d be amazed how much the pattern recognition and problem-solving skills provided by ADHD help.”said one.

EPIDEMIOLOGISTS 

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Epidemiology involves investigating outbreaks, analyzing data, and identifying trends, offering a stimulating and constantly evolving environment that can engage individuals with ADHD.

“Epidemiologist. What I do and learn is fascinating and keeps me engaged most of the day, but some requirements are not fun. I struggle with starting and finishing some projects. 

I also want everything to be perfect for fear of being called an idiot (which I know won’t happen, but I am anxious), so I’m slow sometimes. I get to work from home four days a week, which is great because I feel comfortable and can just put my noise-canceling headphones on and go.”

VIDEO GAME PRODUCER

1. playing video games

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Game development involves diverse tasks, from design and programming to art, sound design, and storytelling. This variety keeps boredom at bay and allows individuals with ADHD to focus on areas that align with their interests and skills.

“Video game producer. Always busy, a stimulating job. Before that, I was a game tester, which also worked well.” said one.

FINANCIAL ADVISOR 

manager

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The financial industry can be fast-paced and demanding, with tight deadlines and pressure to achieve performance goals. This can keep people with ADHD stimulated.

“Financial advisor. The good part is that I can problem-solve solutions for people’s situations, which interests me. The hard part is it’s easy to procrastinate.” said one.

SYNTHETIC CHEMIST

Young pharmacist serving sick patient with the right treatment.

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A user said, “Synthetic chemist, specifically in process development for pharmaceutical ingredients. It involves a lot of active problem-solving and tends to be something different every day, which I love.”

JEWELER 

ash money and jewelry, pawn shop and buy and sell precious metals concept, golden rings, necklace bracelet o wooden background, closeup

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Jewelry-making involves working with your hands to create beautiful and unique pieces, providing a satisfying and tangible outlet for creativity. This can be especially engaging for individuals with ADHD who enjoy hands-on activities and dislike traditional desk jobs.

A user shared, “I’m a jeweler. All my jobs have due dates in big numbers at the top (I keep them in order and go down the line). I enjoy setting stones; the work has creative elements and problem-solving. I get to play with fire and diamonds. Also, I don’t have to talk to customers often.”

PSYCHOTHERAPIST 

happy male medical doctor portrait in hospital

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Variety is good for someone with ADHD; it keeps them stimulated and interested.

A user said, “I’m a psychotherapist! I love it as each client brings something different, and I always learn something from them. I am concerned about being in charge of all the administrative side and remembering to contact clients/potential clients. Very much looking forward to working from home too!”

INTERIOR DESIGNER 

Gentle man

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Interior design often requires creative problem-solving to overcome space limitations, budget constraints, or client preferences.

“Interior designer (mostly the drawing and presentation of interior design, like the construction documents and 3D rings). I love it!” said one.

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This article was originally published on Mrs. Daaku Studio.